Review: Tarte Rejuvelash

By Voxy  

A Biologist’s recent comments on the Wall about mascaras flaking got me thinking about this product, which I don’t think I ever reviewed.

Tarte’s Rejuvelash is an oddball little product that I can’t manage to either like or dislike. It’s a clear, moist gel with aloe and vitamins that you can use later in the day to refresh your mascara if your lashes have started to dry out and get spidery. It declumps and helps make lashes feel softer and more natural. So you could do a day at the office and then use this to refresh your look before going out at night instead of swiping another coat of mascara on and possibly making your lashes either clumpy or more spidery.

Oddly, you can also use it as a sort of primer and apply it to bare lashes before putting on mascara. Which is kind of counterintuitive — if it’s supposed to soften mascara, it seems like it would be kind of a bad primer. But it’s not bad. It doesn’t lengthen lashes at all (then again, it doesn’t promise to), but it does make mascara go on with fewer clumps.

I think I just don’t wear nearly enough mascara for this product to make a real difference. I also think I’m OK with that.

Of course, it wouldn’t be a Tarte review if (in spite of how much I like their products overall) I didn’t pick on their marketing language. Ready?

Quoth Tarte: “This unique lash exhilarator uses a blend of natural emulsifying agents in combination with our patented flexible bristle brush to gently eliminate clumps.”

Lash “exhilarator”? Really? When I put it on, are my lashes going to jump up and down with excitement? Someone needs to scour the Tarte offices and remove every single thesaurus they find. I bet they have ’em hiding under plants and stuff.

By the way, “flexible bristle brush” means that the joint between the brush tip and the shaft bends crazily when you try to push it back into the container because the flange around the opening to the container is really tight and the stem of the brush doesn’t really seem quite strong enough to push the brush into the container. (Yes, innuendos abound here. But it would be vulgar of me to mention them.) And the bristles themselves aren’t really flexible, and even if they were, your lashes hardly provide enough resistance to make them bend.

Tarte also cites the “Skinvigorating ™ ” ingredients that Rejuvelash contains:

• Aloe leaf extract (I’m all right with that one)
• Provitamin B5, a “vitamin B derivative that treats and thickens lashes” (I’m all right with this one too, although the “thickens lashes” part is always an iffy claim)
• Vitamin C, an “antioxidant that fights free radical damage and prevents oxidative stress and premature signs of aging, while brightening skin.” OK, here we get into trouble. Do I really have free radical damage on my eyelashes? Are my eyelashes prematurely aging? And vitamin C brightens skin, maybe, but I’m putting it on my lashes.
• Water, because “pure water delivers and retains moisture.” ::eyeroll:: Water delivers moisture? Who’d a thunk it? And water retains moisture? ::beats head against wall:: And we’re not even getting into the “pure” issue. Really, Tarte is the only company that is trying to spin the leading ingredient in almost every single skincare product we buy into a unique brand-specific value-adding component.

OK, enough. It’s all right. It does help mascara look fresher at the end of the day. And if they didn’t make all these fabulous claims for it, I probably wouldn’t even be tempted to snark about it.

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Tarte Rejuvelash: $16

Provenance: Purchased

Price/Value Ratio (high-end: poor/fair/good/excellent): I’m wavering between “poor” and “fair” on this one. For the price, my lashes aren’t nearly exhilarated enough. I wouldn’t say they’re anything beyond “mildly pleased.”

Purchase again? Nah.

(Have you used this product? Love it? Hate it? Want it? Give a holler in the comments!)

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9 Comments

  1. avatar a biologist
    Posted June 23, 2010 at 6:20 pm | Permalink | Reply

    At Sephora.com you can, for $19, get a Rejuvelash and a Lights, Camera, Lashes purple snakeskin condom mascara. So my Beauty Insider email has just informed me.

    I am so very tempted, as I already need to reorder my Fresh soy facewash stuff. Will one or both of these be the solution to my quest for mascara that still looks good at 4 p.m.?

      (Quote)

    • avatar Voxy
      Posted June 23, 2010 at 10:33 pm | Permalink | Reply

      Well, you know that in spite of the horrible packaging, I do really like the Lights, Camera, Lashes mascara. A lot. But I tend to avoid mascara that makes me look like I have false lashes, so if you want something super-dramatic (which I kind of don’t think you do, based on the admittedly little I know about you) — anyway, if you want big huge heavy lashes, it doesn’t do that. But personally, I like it a lot.

        (Quote)

      • avatar a biologist
        Posted June 23, 2010 at 11:43 pm | Permalink | Reply

        You’re right, I don’t want a super-dramatic look from my everyday mascara. I’m also not sure that I could get a dramatic look without false lashes anyway, as my real ones are pretty sparse.

        The Tarte 4-day stain (review pending) has its good points, so with that and your recommendation I’ll probably order.

          (Quote)

  2. avatar marigolds
    Posted June 21, 2010 at 6:23 pm | Permalink | Reply

    I know! It is ridiculous.
    This is what the Aveda marketing booklet of their Damage Remedy range suggests: “Since hair is an outgrowth of protein, quinoa works wonders on repairing your strands from the inside out. Plus, quinoa has amino acids, which are not only nutritious, but work as the building blocks to create healthy hair. ”No, no, no! I repeat; NO.  

    Maybe if you ATE it…

      (Quote)

  3. avatar chaosbydesign
    Posted June 20, 2010 at 10:42 pm | Permalink | Reply

    “OK, here we get into trouble. Do I really have free radical damage on my eyelashes?”

    A quick search suggests a lot of cosmetic products claim that you are indeed at risk of eyelash damage from free radicals, however no scientific studies exist to support this from what I can tell from searching PubMed.

    I do get the ‘pure water’ bit in principle, though; not the delivering and retaining (heh!) moisture, but the water they use will be pure (deionised) to avoid reactions with any of the other ingredients. Unfortunately, I am not entirely convinced that that is what they were alluding to in the part you quoted.

      (Quote)

    • avatar Voxy
      Posted June 20, 2010 at 10:48 pm | Permalink | Reply

      “Unfortunately, I am not entirely convinced that that is what they were alluding to in the part you quoted.”

      Me neither. The ingredient list does not specify that the water is deionized. Just says plain old “Water.” Had they backed up their spin with science, I wouldn’t be picking on them.

      I would like to know how they measure lash “exhilaration.” Is there a before-and-after survey? Do they ask your lashes questions? Is this IRB-approved?

        (Quote)

      • avatar chaosbydesign
        Posted June 20, 2010 at 11:19 pm | Permalink | Reply

        “I would like to know how they measure lash “exhilaration.” Is there a before-and-after survey? Do they ask your lashes questions? Is this IRB-approved?”

        I don’t know; I’m slightly concerned that these eyelashes they tested on might be experiencing long term trauma from whatever procedure they are using.

        “Had they backed up their spin with science, I wouldn’t be picking on them”

        Cosmetics companies should be made to back up their claims with scientific evidence. Did I tell you about the argument I had with an Aveda sales representative about how it is physically impossible to restore hair protein by using a product containing amino acids? If that was the case, I’d pour our lab amino acid stocks on my hair and use purified DNA as an anti-ageing solution. (Incidentally the argument was largely ineffective as I bought the product anyway — though not for the amino acid content — but it was rather amusing to listen to her attempt to justify the ‘science’ behind the product)

          (Quote)

        • avatar Voxy
          Posted June 20, 2010 at 11:23 pm | Permalink | Reply

          Nothing makes me laugh harder than “anti-aging” shampoo. Um, excuse me, hair is ALREADY DEAD.

            (Quote)

          • avatar chaosbydesign
            Posted June 20, 2010 at 11:35 pm | Permalink | Reply

            I know! It is ridiculous.

            This is what the Aveda marketing booklet of their Damage Remedy range suggests: “Since hair is an outgrowth of protein, quinoa works wonders on repairing your strands from the inside out. Plus, quinoa has amino acids, which are not only nutritious, but work as the building blocks to create healthy hair. ”

            No, no, no! I repeat; NO.

              (Quote)

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